Place Names in Clay County (Gazateer, in historical parlance)

Gazatteer

For a small county, we've sure accumulated plenty of settlements and towns over the years. As you're reading various historical sources, you may find it helpful to refer to this page for some context about various places you come across.jolt

See also Land Grants, most of which did not receive names. Acknowledgement is given to the David Rumsey map collection, along with the many public maps archives which are linked to below.

So far the place names have been cataloged until about 1920. Research continues, in particular checking these places:

  • Plat maps
  • Map CCA101810: Clarkville, Clay Hill, Durham, Ellaville, Ellsville, Fellowship Park, Maxville, Montezuma, Neilhurst, New Lawtey, Register Bridge, Sungarden, Virginia Village, Yellow Water
  • Map CCA101810 Schools: Brownsville, Bulman, Dowling Bridge, Grove Park, Hickmon Ford, Pine Grove, Pine Level, Providence, River's Mill, Rose Hill, Station Pond, Swimming Pen, Taylor Landing
  • Place Name Spreadsheet: Peer Station, Leghee, Doctors Lake, Moosehaven, Fout's Mill, Pass Station, Camp Blanding, Gold Head, Hatcherville, Hewitt, Waterloo
  • Fl State Archives Nautical Chart
  • Cemetery Subject Files
  • School board minutes
  • Ferry landings

Allen Lake

Named for Wyatt C. Allen (22-8-23)

Ates Creek

A tributary of the South Fork of Black Creek. Nicely shown on a 1929 map.

Athens

Eighth stop of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations. "Parade of Memories" indicates it was also called Belmore, although this may be in error since several maps (for example 1891, Matthews-Northrup) show them as distinct. It boasted a post office from 1891 through 1894. It last appears on a map in 1897.

Banana

Sometimes used interchangeable with Melrose, but more strictly speaking a location a little south of Melrose on Etoniah Creek which had a Banama Mill (about 1867 - 1910) and a post office (1875 - 1894). Slightly outside Clay County.

B & W Junction

Eleventh of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). Only once on a map in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup). No other references found.

Bayard Tract (later Walkill)

Laid out by Duncan Clinch it didn't last long because of the Seminole Wars, and only appeared on a map in 1835 (courtesy of Roy Winkelman). Later resurrected and mentioned in "Where to Go in Florida", 1880. Named for Bayard Clinch, sone of Duncan Clinch.

BelmoreBelmore (or Belmore City; previously called Athens)

Sixth stop of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations. Shown on plat book 1, pg 20. Promoted itself in 1884. Boasted a post office from 1885 through 1917. A cemetery (sometimes called the Evergreen Cemetery at Belmore) was concecrated in 1892. It begins appearing on maps in 1886 (source lost), on a map in 1888 as Delmore (spelling error), and as the end of the line for the uncompleted Green Cove Springs & Melrose Railroad in 1890. (Matthews-Northrup). It last appears on a map in 1898 (Rand McNally). "Parade of Memories," pg 6 indicates without source that it was previously called Athens, but is shown on several maps as a distinct settlement. (T4-R24)

See Belmore's original plat (1885)

Parade of Memories (pg. 67) deduces Piney Grove was once called Scrub and may then have become the nucleus for Belmore.

Black Creek (area)

Early accounts often simply refer to Black Creek since no settlement areas had been named yet. The Spanish called it Rio Blanco (White River), and the Seminoles called it Wealuste. The creek system stretches far into the county and was of major importance during colonial and territorial periods. Ft. Heileman (Heilman) used it to float hundreds of shipments of supplies to its storage facilities. Middleburg (previously Garey's Ferry, Ft. Heileman, Whitesvile) is at the fork of the north and south prongs. A railroad stop was at "Black Creek" from 1888 through 1891.

Black Creek Arsenal

Previously called Garey's Ferry Ordinance Depot, it lay across the creek from Garey's Ferry, just opposite the boat ramp. It was positioned away from the fort, to avoid explosions. In operation 1837-1840.

Black Creek, Lake of

Appears on the 1865 Civil War Map, Sheet XI. No other references known. May now be called Varnes Lake.

Bone Esperance

Andrew Pleym's plantation, where the Lower Crisp had been at Creighton's Island (North Fleming Island).

Blue Pond

A lake with a small settlement near it. First appeared on a sectional map in 1888 (Plant System) and the last in 1897 (Rand McNally). A cemetery was established there before 1869, with the last burial being in 1891. In Camp Blanding.

Brainerd (Brainerd; apparenlty also called Hugh(s))

A stop on the Florida Transit and Peninsular RR (est.1861), called Atlantic, Gulf and West India RR (from 1872). First appeared on a map in 1888 (Plant System) and last appeared in 1894 (Matthews-Northrup).

Brooklyn (see Keystone Heights, which it was renamed in 1921)

Brooklyn Lake

Perhaps named by New York solders at Fort No. 11

Buck Creek

An incorrect label for Black Creek on the 1933 Official Road Map of Florida

Bull Creek

A tributary of the South Fork of Black Creek. Nicely shown on a 1929 map.

Burlington Sawmill Grant

100 acre tract of the McIntosh estate (Laurel Grove), sold in 1853 to H. R. Sadler, Sr.

Cain Field (see Elm Springs)

Camp Augusta

Near Walkill. In operation during 1836. May be same as Fort Bayard. See plat Book 1, page 33, where the old fort is shown.

Camp Blanding (which occupies historical Waller and surrounding area)

Camp Brown (see Fort Brown)

The Chautauqua City

Keystone Heights. See their water tower photo in the centerfold of Parade of Memories.

Clarendon

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Clarks Creek (Clarkes Creek)

A short creek which flows directly into the St. Johns, south of Green Cove Springs. A 1929 map shows the creek system rather well.

Claudia

Mentioned in only reference -- the 1899 list of post offices. Only two people name Claudia were known to be active in Clay about that time: Burkhead (defendant in court case) and Moody (probated in 1933, case 777). Maxwell and Simmons are mentioned in the 1910, so those are possibilities as well.

Chesuuiskia (Chesuwiskia, Chesawiskia, Cheswiski, Chesuwiski, possibly changed from Thomasville and to Palan)

Boasted a post office in 1858 and 1859. It lost its post office in 1860 when no one bid for postal route 6519. "Florida From When We Came" pg 21 indicates Chesuwiski was previously called Thomasville. First appears on a map in 1874 (source lost) and finally in 1882 (Colton). Chesuwiski Road, in poor condition, is referred to in "Sharon sprouted with pines, oranges."

Clinch Station

Itt appears only on the Cram railroad map of 1889 (circa) and in plat book 1, pg 31 in 1898. It was the first of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). More often, it is a station on the JT&KW line where Walkill was.

Clyde (see West Tocoi)

Constancia (Constantia) (see Magnolia Springs)

The name of the Travers gran just north of Governors Creek. It is a small part of what was the British grant to Patrick Tonyn. Later, the Spanish granted it to Thomas Travers. WIlliam Travers in herited it and named it after his daughter. His wife Rebecca (Smith) inherited it after his death. She later married Joseph finegan, who became the CSA general in command of Florida. A letter survives written by Finegan from Constancia in 1847.

Crisp (or Crispe, Upper Crisp & Lower Crisp)

Both the Upper Crisp and Lower Crisp were land grants of the James Crisp who entered into an agreement with the Earl of Egmont during the British Period to develop them. He in turn higher a developer to oversee them. The Upper Crisp comprised not only what later became Pengree and Kingsley's Laurel Grove (Orange Park are), but stretched far to the northwest. It had a planned village just north of Kingsley Avenue, somewhere between Blanding boulevard and the junior high school; it may never have been actually built. The Lower Crisp was just south of the mouth of Doctors Lake and comprised Creighton island and more. It also had a planned village just west of US 17. "Early History of Clay County" includes a detailed treatment.

David

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Devil's Wash Basin

Now called Deer Lake. In Gold Head State Park

Doctor

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

 

Doctors Inlet 1910Doctors Inlet (most likely prev. called Willford)

Doctors Inlet boasted a post office from 1913. Plat book 2, pg 17 shows its railroad depot. It first appears on a map in 1920 (US Railroad Admin).

 

 

Doctors Lake (rarely called Lake Levett)

Briefly called Lake Levett (after Francis Levett land grant) during the British period, it has been known as Doctors Lake since the second Spanish period. No definitive proof has been found for who it has been named for, although we are certain that a 2010 article claiming it was named for early 20th century doctors who lived on the lake is inaccurate. Some possibilities to explore: Dr. William Bartram (he named several areas after himself, including Bartram's Bluff), Dr. William Turnbull (of New Smyrna -- no known connection here, but one of the first physcians in East Florida), Dr. Thomas Travers (the Royal Physician to both the British and Spanish, with a plantation at Governor's Creek). We would be pleased to hear your own theories.

Maps:

1890s showing Bardin estate now has Doctors Lake Estates area, along with four large lots running the extent of west side of lake.

Draper

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Durham

A very short-lived community, boasting a post office from 1897-1900. Not map references found.

Earl (Earle) Lake

Named after Leila T. Earle (2-8-23)

Elm Springs (Fuente de Alamo)

Englewood

Only listed on the 1886 list of post offices.

Etoniah (Etoniah Scrub) (once mispelled Ekoniah)

A region of Indian encampments on the Clay - Putnam border, perhaps mostly in Putnam. Some early accounts describe the interior of Clay as Etoniah, including Louise Seymour Townsend's travel account, "Ekoniah Scrub".

Federal Hill

Boasted a post office from 1887 through 1894. A northern man tried to develop it, charging southerns more for lots than northerns. Not surprislingly it didn't thrive. The Archives retains a subject file containing a beautiful town map showing Lincoln Park at its center, along with a pamphlet and other items. Only its cemetery survives.

False

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Fire

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Fleming

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Fouts Mill

Probably Martin Fouts. Settlement named in 1910 Census.

Fuente de Laurel (see Springfield)

Fuente de Alamo (see Elm Springs)

Fleming Island

Previously called Hibernia (i. e., Ireland) by Georgia Fleming, who received a Spanish land grant,and during the British Period called Hawkes Island. Home of the Fleming Family. Hibernia first appeared on a map in 1823 (Vignoles) and Fleming first appeared in 1837 (Williams). Boasted a post office from 1849 to 1931. There are many resources related to this area, including "Hibernia: The Unreturning Tide" by Margaret Seton Fleming, available at the Archives. A cemetery was consecrated at St. Margaret's in 1821 and remains active. Fleming sported a railroad stop from 1888 for about twenty years.

Florence (See Newburg)

Appearing on a map only once in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup), it is possible that the map is in error.

Florence Mills (See Novella)

Flowers Prairie

Named after Lewis Flowers, about 1880 (36-8-23)

Fort Bayard (See Camp Augusta)

Fort Brown

Mentioned in Brennan's land grant, otherwise unknown. Perhaps on Black Creek in 1842 (Seminole War)

Fort Fuegers (or Fuegers Fort)

Only shown on one map in 1829 (U. S. Board of Improvement). Shown on the north side of the North Fork where the Ft. Heileman armory later stood. This fort is a mystery, not known by locals, not found in other sources, and not detailed in either Parade of Memories or Early History of Clay County. Would be an excellent research topic. Perhaps a corruption of another name, but no local name at that time is similar.

Fort Heileman (Heilman) (at boat ramp in Middleburg; See Middleburg)

Ft. Heileman was a Second Seminole War army fort with associated supply depot. Ft. Heilman lesson plans are available. An archaelogical dig was completed to examine exposed bricks.

Fort Magnolia

Hastily erected during the Civil War. See Magnolia Springs.

Fort No. 11

At Lake No. 11

Fort Sanderson

A temporay fort of the Seminole War period 1840-1841. At least one private, Lyman Fraklin Rounds, was known to enlist there, on Sept 27, 1840 into the 7th Infantry Co. Exact location unknown.

Fort Van Cortland(t)

Near Kinsley Lake in 1839 (Seminole Wars)

Fouts Mill

A mill in southwest Clay County. An election precinct name in the same area according to the 1930 census map of minor civil places.

Geneva (see Lake Geneva)

Glorat (see Magnolia Springs)

Glorat is mentioned in the Travers grant in "Spanish Land Grants in Florida," pg 155 and 157.

Garey's Ferry (named after Samuel Garey and site of Ft. Heilman; See Middleburg; sometimes mispelled Gary's Ferry or Carrie's Ferry)

Good Fortune

Ambrose Hull's plantation on Doctors Lake.

Governors Creek

Named for British Governor Patrick Tonyn, whose plantation was situation at its mouth. Tonyn received the land grant before he was made goveror.

Green Cove Springs

Originally the George Clarke land grant, Green Cove Springs was established in 1854 as White Sulphur Springs, because of its large artesian flow. It was rename in 1866 to Green Cove Springs, took the county seat from Whitesville (Middleburg) in 1871, and incorporated in 1874. It was fortunate enough to enjoy two heydays, the first being the Hotel Era from after the Civil War to the Great Depression, and a second, when, after WW II, the Mothball Fleet of retired naval vessels were towed there for decommissioning. Green Cove Springs first appears on a map in 1873 (Mitchell's National Map of the American Republic), and then again in 1874 (Drew). It boasted a post office beginning in 1848. Its cemeteries include Old Hickory Grove (before 1826), Magnolia Springs (before 1860), Mose Jones (not Moses Jones; 1878, black), Shiloh Baptist (before 1909, black), (New) Hickory Grove (1916, not related to old), and Mt. Olive (black). Rivers Paupers Cemetery, Crump Field Paupers, and the Green Cove Springs Catholic cemetery locations have been lost.

Green Cove Springs is home the Clay County Archives, the Military Museum and the History and Railroad Museum. It is home to the Village Improvement Association, the oldest Woman's Club in Florida, which opened the County's first library there.

The Sanborn Insurance Maps show buildings in Green Cove Springs in 1909.

Green Pond

Named after Burrell Green, about 1860 (25-8-23)

Harmony Hall (or Harmony House)

Artemas Ferguson's plantation at Swimming Pen Creek.

Hawkes Island

Called Hawkes Island after the British Lord Hawke, it later became Fleming Island.

Hibernia (see Fleming Island)

Also:

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Hall Lake

Named after Lyman Hall, about 1860 (17-8-24)

Hamlyn (Hamlin) Lake

Named after Walter Hamlyn's grover there (5-9-23)

1837 Williams MapHerbert

A mystery, appearing only once, without any other historical reference, on the 1837 Williams map.

Highland (or Highland Station, previously called Trail Ridge)

Trail Ridge was a settlement along the important Alachua Trail (Indian) (see "The Story of The Florida Railroads" by Pettengill). A railway, from Fernandin, later ran along the ridge which was the Florida seashore in much earlier times. Highland was the highest point on the line 1t 210 feet. Its name first appears in Message from the President in 1838, and first appears on a map in 1863 (Perrine). Its name was changed to Highland in 1874 and is shown on a map in 1882 (Colton). Two other Clay County settlements were on the Alachua Trail -- Mrs. Monroes (1836), and Ionia (1888).

Webb's directory (1885) indicates Highland had one store, a lumber mill, and about 200 people.

Hillsford

Mentioned only once, in the 1898 Annual Report of the Railroad Commission of Florida, it was, most likely, a mispelling of Willford.

Hotel

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Hunters Mill (could have been renamed later to Smaile's Switch)

Fifteenth stop of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations. First appears only once on a map in 1893 (Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway). Later maps show Smaile's Switch in about the same position, so it may have been renamed.

Indian Boundary Line

To keep the peace, the British governor Grant convened a congress with the Indians at Picolata and established a line across which Indians and settlers were not allowed to cross. This worked well during the British period but was not effective during the later Spanish period. The area was not well mapped in the 1760s, but it is clearly shown on the 1823 Vignoles map.

Ionia

One of three settlements along the Alachua Trail, along with Mrs. Monroes and Trail Ridge (Highland). It first appears on a map in 1888 (Plant System), but it boasted a post office from 1886 to 1903. It last appeared on a map in 1902 (source lost).

Ivatanoa (Joltanoga, Jotanoga, Ilatamaa, Jurlanoca)

Yamasee and/or Seminole Indian settlements. It is unknown whether they are separate, or simply spelling variations. It is also unclear whether they are in Clay County because the maps are so poor, but no doubt they are nearby. One map be in the forks of Black Creek, and there are reports of later Seminole Indian huts in the Middleburg vicinity. They appear on several maps (1677 Ivatanoa in Timucuan chiefdoms of Spanish Florida. Vol. 2 by John Worth, and again in 1694 in Archaeology of Mission Santa Catalina de Guale by Amy Turner Bushnell; 1742 Ilatamaa on Covens; 1776 Joltanoga on Romans perhaps at Middleburg; 1816 on Melish, who perhaps copied Romans; the last reference being on 1822 Fielding)

It is possible that Middleburg was an old Indian site called Joltanoga (Jotanoga), being 25 miles from Pupo on the Apalache trail as shown on an 1816 map.

It is not likely that Joltanaga is the same place as Suolanocha (Suola Nocha) as hypothesized in the WPA Inventory of the Archives, pg 6. Suolanocha is probably on the Flint River. The WPA writers, perhaps, tried to locate it and mistakenly presumed there may have been handwriting mistakes on maps.

Kellums (or Kellums Junction)

Ninth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1897 (Rand McNally) and last in 1900 (Rand McNally). It was one of the few stops without a post office. The Kellum family is known to have been in the Clay County area as early as 1846 (see Richard Kellum).

Keystone Heights (renamed from Brooklyn in 1921)

Keystone Heights was called Brooklyn until 1921. Brooklyn boasted a post office from 1877 through 1910. It was a stop on the Georgia Southern & Florida RR (est 1890 and closed in1950s). First appeared on a map in 1882 (Colton). In 1921, J. J. Lawrence moved to the area from Pittsburg and began promoting it as Keystone Heights. The Keystone Inn opened in 1924 and the town incorporated in 1925. It first appeared on a map much later in 1932 (USGS), hinting how poor the roads were to that area. An unattributed history of Keystone Heights is presented here. It is detailed in "Parade of Memories."

Kingsley (settlement)

First appeared on a map in 1874 (source lost), again in 1882 (Colton), and finally in 1900 (Rand McNally). It boasted a post office from 1878 through 1906. It is mentioned in "The Key Line" (1884): "[Capt. S. J. Temple] has established a tram-road to Kingsley, six miles distant [from Temple Station, Bradford County], one of the most attractive and prosperous places in this region. It is ten miles from Middleburg, the head of navigation for steamboats on Black creek, a tributary of the St. John's river, and is situated on the shore of Kingsley Lake, a beautiful sheet of clear water, almost perfectly circular and about two miles in diameter, whose surface is some ninety feet above tide-water, giving on its outlet to Black creek a magnificent water-power. The lake is surrounded by high, wooded banks, and the vicinity is settled by a colony of enterprising Northern people. Hunting, fishing, boating, etc., are among the amusements enjoyed by many winter visitors, who find pleasant quarters in private families."

Founded by Simeon Strickland in 1859, nine miles south of Highland. Webb's directory (1885) indicates it had two churches.

Kingsley's Pond / Kingsley Lake

Named for Zephaniah Kingsley, of Laurel Grove. First appears on on the 1829 Seat of War map (you'll need to search "Seat of War" after following the link), although it was probably named earlier before Kingsley had moved from Laurel Grove. A cemetery was established there by as early as 1859 when J. V. Prevatt was buried there, now owned by the Kingsley Lake Baptist Church. Ann Monroe received a land grant there in 1839 (see Parade of Memories), followed by John Harden, Philip Cox, Joseph Truluck, Cassel Sullivan, Randolph Chalker and others.

Lake Geneva (or just Geneva)

Lake Geneva

A stop on the Georgia Southern & Florida RR (est 1890 and closed in1950s). First appears on a map in 1888 (Plant System) and again in 1894 (Matthews-Northrup). It sporadically shows up from time to time after that until it reimerges continuously from 1929 (Cram). It boasted a post office in 1908 and 1909. It is described in "Parade of Memories." Hiram Alderman's on Lake Geneva is shown, from the travelogue "Ekoniah Scrub" by Louise Seymour Townsend. This etching (c1880) is one of the first landscapes showing detail in Clay County.

Originally called Lake No 11, its name was changed to Lake Geneva when the Santa Fe Canal Co. was organized.

Lake Gertrude

Named after Gertrude Meriam (32-8-23)

Lake Levett (see Doctors Lake)

Lake No. 11

Lake Geneva is called Lake No. 11 on Territorial Surveys.

 

Lake View (or Lakeview, or Lake View on Kingsley Lake)

Tenth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1886 and again in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup) and finally in 1900 (Rand McNally). It boasted a post office from 1886 through 1900. The Tropical Land Co. had great plans for establishing Lake View in 1885, and pubished an ad and map in the Jacksonville Board of Trade Report of that year. As it turned out, the line from Belmore ran farther south and bypassed Lake View.

Lakeside (on Sandhill Lake)

It first appears on a map in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup), although it is mistakenly listed as the farthest west of two Lake Views shown. It last appears on a map in 1900 (Rand McNally). It boasted a post office from 1881 through 1902. Webb's directory (1885) indicated it was settled in 1881 by Mr. M. W. Lee, the postmaster in 1885. It had 150 people, and a church. It is situated on rising ground about 25 feet above the level of Sand Hill Lake.

Laurel Grove (rarely called Mount Laurel)

Well known as the first Kingsley Plantation (at Orange Park) in the second Spanish period. He purchased it from Rebecca Pengree (William Pengree's widow). Previously part of the Upper Crisp during the British period. Burned by Ana Kingsley to protect it from rebels. Substantial treatment can be found in "Early History of Clay County", "Parade of Memories" as well as a host of publications about Kingsley. First appears on a map much later than it was formed, in 1874 (Asher & Adams). The name was retired when Orange Park was developed by Washington Benedict. Boasted a post office from 1866 to 1874.

Zephaniah Kingsley sold the plantation to John Houston McIntosh in 1817, who in turn sold it to Stephen Bryan in 1853.

Harriett Beecher Stowe was well acquainted with the property in the late 1860s and in Palmetto Leaves she wrote a few paragraphs about the ex-slaves community there (starts on pg 287).

Leno

Early maps show Leno west on Clark's Creek, but later it apparently moved east and became a railroad station. With the ACL RR borrowed the name, or the settlers actually happened to move is unclear.

Longbanch SchoolLong Branch (see Penney Farms, to which it was renamed in 1927)

The school at Long Branch is shown.

This town was developed by Florida Farms & Industries, which built a canning plant in 1921.

 

 

Lower Crisp (see Crisp)

Magnolia Cemetery

In Orange Park. Not to be confused with Magnolia Springs Cemetery. Moosehaven Cemetery is a section on the Magnolia Cemetery grounds.

Magnolia Springs (The Tonyn Plantation, Santa Thomasa(o), Glorat, Constancia / Constantia, Magnolia Mills)

Part of the Tonyn land grant in the British period, Magnolia Springs later passed to Thomas Travers, his son William Travers, William's wife Rebecca Travers, then to her husband Joseph Finegan, who sold it to Summerlin, who sold it to Nathan Benedict, who sold it Seth Rogers, then to Fay & Cruft, then to Seavey. It has a long history stretching as far back as 1763. It saw activity during the Semiole Wars (called Camp at Magnolia in 1839) and the Civil War. Its glory days were the hotel era when the Magnolia Springs Hotel was in operation and as it faded the Florida Military Academy moved in. A Brief History of Magnolia Springs has been prepared, and 400 pages of source documents are available at the Archives. A cemetery was consecrated at Magnolia Springs, is no longer active, and is owned by the county. Boasted a ferry for a brief period, and a sawmill. A post office was in operation from 1848 to 1926. A J,T&KW (ACL) railroad depot served the hotel and aread. A long pier served steaboats. See plat book 1, pg 14.

McIntosh Plantation (Mackintosh)

McIntosh bought Laurel Grove from Kingsley. See Laurel Grove.

McRae

One of the only settlements that was even near the Bellamy Road. I boasted a post office from 1883 through 1916. It first appeared on a map in 1888 (Plant System) and finally in 1920 (US RR Admin).

Melrose (Melrose Crossing, prev. called Shakerag)

A settlement existed at Melrose as early as 1864, when a letter survives calling it Shakerag. Melrose first appears on a map in 1888 (Plant System). Melrose is split into Putnam, Clay and Bradford counties. Two important histories of Melrose have been writted by Zonira Hunter Tolles: "Bonnie Melrose," and "Shadows in the Sand." The terminus of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). Situated at Lake Santa Fe.

Middle

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Middleburg (Garey's Ferry, Ft. Heilman)

First called Garey's Ferry after Samuel Garey, in the Niles Register in 1836. It appeared on the 1837 John Lee Williams map, the 1842 Breese map, and even though it's name had changed eventually to Middleburg appeared on the Letts map as late as 1883. It was the site of Ft. Heilman, at the exact fork of Black Creek up to the park near the boat ramp during the second Seminole War. The name Middleburg first appears on a map in 1864 (Lindenkohl). A cemetery was established at Ft. Heileman, and another across the north prong (Branning's). This area is well treated in both "Parade of Memories" and "Early History of Clay County".

It is possible that Middleburg was an old Indian site called Joltanoga (Jotanoga), being 25 miles from Pupo on the Apalache trail as shown on an 1816 map.

Mill CoveMill Cove

A bay on the south side of Doctors Lake, indicating the probably location of an early saw or sugar mill. Also the location of a small bombing range during WWII.

Mrs. Monroe's

One of three settlements on the Alachua - St. Mary's trail, along with Trailridge (Highland) and Ionia. It sat at the intersection of the Alachua - St. Mary's trail and the trail to Black Creek (FHQ, Vol 66, No 1, pg 51). It was a road house (inn) far out in the country and must have been a frightful place. It was burned by Indians in 1836 (Niles Register). It appears again on an 1864 Civil War map (Lindenkohl), so it may have been rebuilt, or the copiest may not have known it no longer existed. It is mentioned in the State Laws of Florida (pg 112) to describe the eastern boundary of Columbia County.

Transcribed from Bradford County Telegraph, 100th Anniversary Edition, 1979, section 2, pg 3 (copy available at the Archives):

  • What about this lady who was so well known that her name appears on military maps of the Civil War period, now on display in the museum at Olustee Battlefield State Park? Based on the meager information available, it is believed that Mrs. Monroe had a farm at this well-traveled intersection, and likely operated a "rest stop" in the days of horse-drawn vehicles, offering food and rest for weary travelers. The farm was apparently located on the north side of present Highway 230 at the site where the DuPont Company's new dredge was assembled last year, and is now operating. Also in this area was an Indian War Fort, Van Cortland, built for the protection of early settlers around Kingsley Lake and elsewhere in the sandhill area of Trail Ridge. Bits of broken crockery, bottles and other household items have been found in recent years at the site of Mrs. Monroe's, as well as Spanish coins dating back to 1773, and several American coins, including a three-cent piece dated 1833, and others from 1840, 1846 and 1851. These coins were salvaged by Kenny Scarbro, a maintenance engineer with the DuPont Company, from the sump of the dredge that sucks up ilmenite ore from a moving lake. All of the coins were badly bent or mangled by passing through the dredge crusher.

Montpellier

Daniel Plummer's Spanish land grant along the St. Johns. Later bought by Ambrose Hull.

Mount Laurel

Usually called Laurel Grove.

Mudge

A stop on the Florida Transit and Peninsular RR (est.1861), called Atlantic, Gulf and West India RR (from 1872). Only reference is in 1929.

Nepumocino Creek

Creek running from St. Johns River State College through Doctors Lake Estates. Shown on Pengree's Elm Springs land grant. Named after Gov. Queseda.

Newburg (shown as Florence in 1891)

Thirteenth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup) where it is called Florence, and finally in 1916 (National Map). Its possible that maps copied each other so that its printed appearance outlasted its populated status. It boasted a post office from 1891 through 1894, kept in the home of Bill Chestnut (see Parade of Memories, pg 221).

Novella (Novilla, Florence Mills)

Third stop of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations. Webb's directory (1885) indicates it was established by G. E. Hunt, the postmaster, in 1883. It is located on a bluff overlooking the railway. It has a school. First appears on a map in 1886, again in 1888 (Plant System), and last appears in 1898 (Rand McNally). Boasted a post office from 1884 through 1896.

There is a possibility that this is related to Novola, an Indian village shown on the St. Augustine-to-St. Mark road in a 1769 map and again on a 1776 map, but it appears that Novola (or Noowalla) is most likely west of Alachua somewhere.

Oak Ridge (Perhaps later called Oypas)

Boasted a post office in 1889. No other references.

Old Hut

A marking on 1834 Pousson map in the vicinity of Whitesville / Middleburg. Not otherwise referred to

Old Field (Oldfield) Pond

(34-8-23)

Orange Park

Originally part of the Upper Crisp, and later part of Pengree and Kingsley's Laurel Grove, Orange Park occupies the area north of Doctors Lake. Mills are shown in its vicinity as early as 1864 (Lindenkohl). It was developed in 1877 by Washington Benedict when his development company platted it and sold lots. Its name first appears on a map in 1882 (Colton), and it was incorporated in 1891.

Webb's directory (1885) indicated that Orange Park had one hotel, three stores and NO saloon. W. A. Benedict (the founder) was also the principal of Clay Collegiate Institute. The dock extended 1,400 feet and cost $7,700. Benedict bought the land for Orange Park for $32,500.

Oypas (Perhaps prev. Oak Ridge)

Boasted a post office from 1889 through 1907. First appeared on a map in 1898 (source lost), and again in 1900 (Rand McNally) and finally in 1909. Not much is known, other than W. H. Biggs, the Supt. of Registration lived there and resigned June 24, 1904.

Palan (possibly was earlier called Chesuuiskia)

One of the few settlements to appear between the Seminole Wars and the Civil War. It boasted a post office from 1858 through 1867. Its first and only appearance on a map is in 1865 (General Topographical Map Sheet XI) as a cluster of houses on a trail from Middleburg southeast to Bellamy Road. It may have succumbed to Civil War hostilities.

The Parlor City

Green Cove SPrings.

Penney Farms (prev. Long Branch)

The beautiful retirement community of Penney Farms. Previously it had been promoted by Robert L. Dowling and the Florida Farms & Industries Co. The Archives has an interesting pamphlet trying to attract pecan growers and farmers. J. C. Penney purchased that property and once again promoted

Peoria

The settlement of Peoria enjoyed a post office from 1886 to 1932. It is located in the vicinity of Peoria Road. James Silcox hauled freight with his teams of oxen from Doctors Lake into the interior of the county. Plat book 2, pg 42 shows the location of the railroad depot. It first appeared on a map in 1886 (source lost) and again in 1888 (Plant System), last appearing in 1932 (USGS).

Peter's Creek

Peters Creek FordA tributary of Black Creek, starting in the southeast portion of the county, winding around Governors Creek and emptying into Black Creek near where it joins with the St. Johns. "The Ford" is shown, from the travelogue "Ekoniah Scrub" by Louise Seymour Townsend.

Shown on the circa 1889 Cram map as a station name on the Green Cove Springs & Melrose railroad.

Piney Grove (Pine Grove)

BCC Minutes show a voting precinct was moved from Piney Grove to Fouts Mill.

Owned by Goold T. Butler. See details.

Parade of Memories deduces Piney Grove was once called Scrub and may then have become the nucleus for Belmore.

The Oak Grove Baptist church met in the Pine Grove school house from 1915 through 1918, when it became defunct.

Rideout

Site of a ferry at Gad Frisbee's place, two miles due east of the fork of Black Creek (3 1/2 miles by water). Renamed to Rideout when a post office was established there in 1900.

Pleym's Island

Now called Creighton Island, after John W. Creighton, who bought Andrew Pleym's land grant.

Preachers Retreat

Shown on the 1885 Jacksonville Board of Trade Report, on the west side of Kingsley Lake, but not otherwise refered to.

Prox

Associated with Bellamy Road, its exact position is unknown. It has not been found on maps. It boasted a post office from 1911 through 1916.

Quigley

A very short-lived community, boasting a post office from 1894-1896. Not map references found.

Ragged

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Red

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Rideout

Perhaps a phonetic spelling of Ridaught, relating to the Ridaught Indians who did have a presence in Florida. See document CCA100609 for material related to the Ridaught band. Rideout boasted a post office from 1900 through 1921. A cemetery was consecrated in 1900 as well. It is not found on historical maps.

Ridgewood

Shown on the 1885 Jacksonville Board of Trade Report, but not otherwise refered to.

Ridgley's Mills

At the mouth of Black Creek. 1836. See "Journals of Lieutenant John Pickell", by Frank L. White, Jr, Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol 38, No 2, October 1959, pg 146. [No Ridgeley's of any spelling variation are mentioned elsewhere in Clay County untiul George Ridgely (black), who voted in 1876.

Rio Blanco

The Spanish name for Black Creek, which is a bit odd since the water is so inky black with tanins. However, a theory is that before Budington and others harvested the cypress along the creek banks for shingles and lumber, the creek was ghostly white in the winter when the leaves fall.

Rivers Mill

Settlement named in 1910 Census.

Russell

Russell boasted a post office from 1900 through 1955, but it doesn't appear on a map until 1920 (US RR Admin). For a time, it was a stop on the ACL rail line. The store at Russell wasn't much.

San Francisco de Pupo (Fort, Pupa, Poppa)

Not to be confused with San Francisco -- both Poppa and San Francisco can be seen separately on the1810 Arrowsmith map. An archaeological dig was performed by John Goggin in 1951 and he published his results in "Fort Pupo: A Spanish Frontier Outpost" (Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol XXX, No 2, October, 1951). He indicates that it was probably first inhabited by Indians in about 1650 and that they may have been forced to abandon it with James Moore's invasion in 1702. The Spanish built a for there in 1734 and It first appears on a map in 1736 (Holl). James Oglethorpe invaded Florida in 1739 and overran the fort in 1740. It stopped appearing after 1811 (Carey). The area is slowly eroding into the St. Johns River. It boast an historical marker. "Early History of Clay County" includes a detailed treatment of the area.

San Diego de Salamoto (Salamatoto)

Spanish mission. Parade of Memories (pg 4) says it was at West Tocoi, Mark F. Boyd in "Missions Sites in Florida" lists it on the EAST bank of the St. John's near Picolata (Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol 17, No 4, April 1939). The St. Johns Historical Commission believes it was on the east side and installed a marker there. Blakey's Parade of Memories references in note 6 need to be exlored to see if they are persuavive.

Sand Hill (Sandhill) Lake

First appears on a map in 1864 (Lindenkohl). Very rarely referred to. (33-7-23)

Santa Fe Lake

Lake Santa FeNear Melrose, just west of Clay county. The etching shown is from the travelogue "Ekoniah Scrub" by Louise Seymour Townsend.

Scrub

Parade of Memories (pg. 67) deduces Piney Grove was once called Scrub and may then have become the nucleus for Belmore.

Saranac

Sixteenth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup) and last in 1900 (Rand McNally).

Self

A railroad stop between Fleming and Magolia, it appears on maps only in 1929, and is not otherwise referred to.

Seminole Springs

Usually called Wadesboro Springs, on the west side of Doctors Lake.

Seppho

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Shakerag

Apparently in a reference to horseracing, Melrose was apparently called Shakerag early on, including in an 1864 Civil War letter from Brig. Gen Hatch to Col. Noble.

Sharon (sometimes East Sharon and West Sharon)

Fourth and fifth stops of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations. Webb's directory (1885) indicated that Sharon was settled by its postmaster, J. B. Register and had 250 people. H. E. Bemis established a newspaper in 1884. McGee and Hunt had sawmill(s). Budington, Wilson and Berry had timberland. J. N. Moore ran a turpentine still.

Sharon first appears on a map in 1886. East Sharon and Sharon appear in 1888. Sharon and West Sharon in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup). Generally, East Sharon and Sharon are shown on maps until they disappear after 1898 (Rand McNally). A cemetery (Sharon, or Salem Baptist Church) was concecrated before 1886.

Smaile's Switch

Fourteenth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1892 (Rand McNally) where it is called Florence, and finally in 1900 (Rand McNally). Its possible that maps copied each other so that its printed appearance outlasted its populated status. It boasted a post office from 1891 through 1894. Smaile's Switch could have originally been called Hunter's Mill.

Soldiers Pond

After soldiers at Fort No. 11 (19-8-23)

Spring Garden

Spring Garden and Tobacco Bluff were British land grants to John Davis in 1766 along Doctors Lake. No map or survey has yet appeared. Dr. Shafer briefly discusses them.

Spring Lake (or Springlake)

Twelfth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1888 and again in 1891 (Matthews-Northrup) and finally in 1894 (Matthew-Northrup). It boasted a post office from 1890 through 1895.

Springfield (Fuente de Laurel)

Kingsley called it Tulula Springs and established a mill there (see photo in Early History, page 85)

Sugarhouse Cove

On Doctors Lake, just north of Doctors Lake Estates.

Sugar works are shown on the Bien 1865 map and the cove north of present day Doctors Lake Estates is still called Sugarhouse Cove.

Sunnyside

Sunnyside boasted a post office from 1908 through 1915, but it doesn't appear on a map until 1920 (US RR Admin) and as late as 1929 (Cram)

Swindle Lake

There were several Swindles in the area, about 1880. (11-8-23)

Thomasville (see Wilderness)

Rarely referred to as Thomasville. See a reference in "Florida Place Names" by Morris.

Tiger Head

Site of a Civil War skirmish on a road between Middleburg and Green Cove Springs, October 24, 1864. Described in "Dickinson and His Men" available at the Archives.

Tobacco Bluff

Spring Garden and Tobacco Bluff were British land grants to John Davis in 1766 along Doctors Lake. No map or survey has yet appeared. Dr. Shafer briefly discusses them.

Trail Ridge (see Highland, which it was later called)

Turkey Bluff

A 50 acre plantation belonging to the son of Artemas Ferguson. Across Doctors Lake from Harmony Hall.

Tulula Springs

Part of Kingsley's holdings, usually called Springfield.

Virginia Bluff

Ozias Budington & Henry D. Baldwin bought Jonathan R. Wilson's store and lot on "Virginia Bluff" [Black Creek] Parade of Memories, pg. 35. Not shown on any map. Middleburg.

Wadesboro Springs

Infrequently called Seminole Springs. On the west side of Doctors Lake. Wade bottoled water hear from at least the 1880s through the 1920s. See the St. Johns River Water Management District analysis of the spring.

Walkill (Walkill Farms; previously Bayard Tract)

Shown on plat Book 1, page 33 John G. Borden (of Borden Milk) purchased Clinch's Bayard Tract and renamed it Walkill. Robert L. Dowling (sometimes incorrectly spelled Dollings), of Ohio, purchased Walkill from Borden's estate and established the Walkill Stock Farms. Dowling, with his investors bought up nearly one third of the county and established The Florida Farms & Industries Co, hoping to attract farmers. In the end he failed, and eventually J. C. Penney bought his holdings in bankruptcy. First appears on a map in 1886, and again in 1888 (Plant System), and as last as 1932 (USGS). It boasted a post office from 1886 through 1913.

Waller (sometimes looks like Walter on fuzzy maps)

Waller boasted a post office from 1893 through 1917. Nicholas O. Waller was its postmaster for a time. He made a curious will (it's a good read) in 1893, and died in 1898. The settlement may have been named for him. It first appeared on a map in 1892 (Rand McNally) and finally in 1920 (Rand McNally). 12,000 acres were planted in 2,000 camphor trees by the E. I Dupont Power Company, used for making gunpowder, so it is likely that it has been obliterated by present day Camp Blanding.

Wealuste

The Seminoles called Black Creek Wealuste, and Chief Micanopy spent his early days there.

Wee Louka (or Wee Iouka)

Area along the St. Johns, only referred to once -- in an 1846 map (Bruff)

West Tocoi

A forelorn place in the best of historical times. It boasted a post office from 1885 through 1925, but not much else. It was primarily a stop on the J,T&KW rail line from which passengers could catch a steam launch, the Louise, from the west side of the river to Tocoi on the other side, and then on to St. Augustine and other places. An 1860 map mispells it Toco and since no "East" Tocoi is shown, the map may have misplaced Tocoi on the wrong side of the river. It first appears correctly in 1885 (ACL). In 1900 and 1901 its post office was known by the name "Clyde," and is shown that way on a 1902 map -- probably in reference to the Clyde Line steamers. Several references to how poor its depot were have been found dating from 1883 through 1916. A group of block buildings remained until recent years, which had been for the use of black turpentine workers.

Wharf

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

White

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

White House

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

White Springs (or White Sulphur Springs, later called Green Cove Springs) (G. J. F. Clark 1816 land grant)

On the west side of the St. Johns, opposite Picolata, on the Federal Road.

Whitesville (later changed to Webster, and now in Middleburg) (see also, "Old Hut")

First appeared in 1828 when the County's first post office was inaugurated there. The post office was in operation until 1843, at which time it was moved to Garey's Ferry (Middleburg). First written about in the Niles Register 1836. First appeared on the First Territorial Survey in 1833, then again on a map in 1839 (Burr), then appeared frequently until last in 1883. It's name was changed to Webster in honor of Daniel Webster. Webster first appeared on a map in 1888 (Plant System), and last appeared in 1894 (Matthews-Northrup), perhaps because it had assimilated into Middleburg by then. Whitesville/Webster remained a distinct settlement from Garey's Ferry / Ft. Heilmenan / Middleburg for most of its existence. (T5-R25-Sec14)

The County Seat from formation of the county in 1859 through 1871 when it was moved to Green Cove Springs.

Whitesville declined in part because they rejected a proposed railroad, which was diverted to Green Cove Springs. The local lore is that Middleburgers voted to reject the railroad, but another possiblity is that Joseph Finegan, the contractor laying tracks for the Florida Railroad, lobbied for it to be moved closer to his tract at Magnolia Springs (he sold out before it was actually laid there).

It had four streets: Commerce, Pine, Cedar and Mulberry, but Parade of Memories (pg 51) doesn't give a source or a map.

"Bonnie Melrose," pg 15, claims that Whitesville was named after Doctor White, who had a partnership with an unsavory Frenchman [perhaps Fourgere, of which nothing else is known.]

Wilby

Shown on only one map in 1888 (source lost) and boasted a post office from 1888 through 1891. No other references.

Wilkerson's (or Wilkinson's) (station)

The second of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations(est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appears on a map in 1888, again i 1891 (Matthrews-Northrup) as Wilkerson's, again in 1897 (Rand McNally) as Wilkinson's, last appearing in 1898 (Rand McNally).

Willford (probably later called Doctors Inlet)

Show on plat book 1, pg 47, Willford was probably the precurser to Doctors Inlet. It first appears on a map in 1888 (source lost), again in 1900 (Rand McNally), and on the O'Hern survey in plat book 1. An 1898 Annual Report of the Railroad Commission of the State of Florida apparently corrupts Willford into Hillsford, since Hillsford references don't appear elsewhere.

Wilderness (also called Thomasville rarely, then Chesuwiski for a time)

Seventh of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations(est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1874, and again 1882 (Colton), last appearing in 1898 (Rand McNally). It boasted a post office from 1874 through 1890.

Webb's directory (1885) indicated that Wilderness had between twenty and thirty families and boasted one church and a common school. Martin Fouts had an an orange grove and was postmaster. [Perhaps Fouts Mill was nearby]

Wilkies

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John's in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Yellow Water Creek

A tributary of the North Fork of Black Creek flowing from Duval County. Nicely shown on a 1929 map.