Towns and Settlements G-H

Geneva (see Lake Geneva)

Glorat (see Magnolia Springs)

Glorat is mentioned in the Travers grant in “Spanish Land Grants in Florida,” pg 155 and 157.

Garey’s Ferry (named after Samuel Garey and site of Ft. Heileman; See Middleburg; sometimes misspelled Gary’s Ferry or Carrie’s Ferry)

Good Fortune

Ambrose Hull’s plantation on Doctors Lake.

Governors Creek

Named for British Governor Patrick Tonyn, whose plantation was situated at its mouth. Tonyn received the land grant before he was made governor.

Green Cove Springs

Originally the George Clarke land grant, Green Cove Springs was established in 1854 as White Sulphur Springs, because of its large artesian flow. It was renamed in 1866 to Green Cove Springs, took the county seat from Whitesville (Middleburg) in 1871, and incorporated in 1874. It was fortunate enough to enjoy two heydays, the first being the Hotel Era from after the Civil War to the Great Depression, and a second, when, after WW II, the Mothball Fleet of retired naval vessels were towed there for decommissioning. Green Cove Springs  appears on a 1874 map. It boasted a post office beginning in 1848. Green Cove Springs is home the Clay County Archives, the Military Museum and the History and Railroad Museum. It is home to the Village Improvement Association, the oldest Woman’s Club in Florida, which opened the County’s first library there.

Green Pond

Named after Burrell Green, about 1860 (25-8-23)

Harmony Hall (or Harmony House)

Artemis Ferguson’s plantation at Swimming Pen Creek.

Hawkes Island

Called Hawkes Island after the British Lord Hawke, it later became Fleming Island.

Hibernia (see Fleming Island)

Also:

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Hall Lake

Named after Lyman Hall, about 1860 (17-8-24)

Hamlyn (Hamlin) Lake

Named after Walter Hamlyn’s grove there (5-9-23)

Herbert

Appearing only once, without any other historical reference, on the 1837 Williams map.

Highland ( Highland Station, Trail Ridge)

Trail Ridge was a settlement along the important Alachua Trail (Native American) (see “The Story of The Florida Railroads” by Pettengill). A railway, from Fernandina, later ran along the ridge which was the Florida seashore in prehistoric times. Highland was the highest point on the line at 210 feet. Its name first appears in Message from the President in 1838, and first appears on a map in 1863. Its name was changed to Highland in 1874 and is shown on a map in 1882. Two other Clay County settlements were on the Alachua Trail — Mrs. Monroe’s (1836), and Ionia (1888).

Webb’s directory (1885) indicates Highland had one store, a lumber mill, and about 200 people.

Hillsford/Willford

Mentioned only once, in the 1898 Annual Report of the Railroad Commission of Florida, where it was misspelled.

Hotel

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Hunters Mill ( renamed later to Smaile’s Switch)

Fifteenth stop of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations. First appears only once on a map in 1893.

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