Towns and Settlements Q-T

Quigley

A very short-lived community, boasting a post office from 1894-1896. Not map references found.

Ragged

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Red

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Rideout

Perhaps a phonetic spelling of Ridaught, relating to the Ridaught Indians who did have a presence in Florida. Rideout boasted a post office from 1900 through 1921. A cemetery was consecrated in 1900 as well. It is not found on historical maps.

Ridgewood

Shown on the 1885 Jacksonville Board of Trade Report, but not otherwise referred to.

Ridgley’s Mills

At the mouth of Black Creek. 1836. See “Journals of Lieutenant John Pickell”, by Frank L. White, Jr, Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol 38, No 2, October 1959, pg 146. [No Ridgeley’s of any spelling variation are mentioned elsewhere in Clay County until George Ridgely (black), who voted in 1876.

Rio Blanco

The Spanish name for Black Creek, which is a bit odd since the water is so inky black with tannins. However, a theory is that before Budington and others harvested the cypress along the creek banks for shingles and lumber, the creek was ghostly white in the winter when the leaves fall.

Rivers Mill

Settlement named in 1910 Census.

Russell

Russell boasted a post office from 1900 through 1955, but it doesn’t appear on a map until 1920.For a time, it was a stop on the ACL rail line. The store at Russell was small.

San Francisco de Pupo (Fort, Pupa, Poppa)

Not to be confused with San Francisco — both Poppa and San Francisco can be seen separately on the1810 Arrowsmith map. An archaeological dig was performed by John Goggin in 1951 and he published his results in “Fort Pupo: A Spanish Frontier Outpost” (Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol XXX, No 2, October, 1951). He indicates that it was probably first inhabited by Indians in about 1650 and that they may have been forced to abandon it with James Moore’s invasion in 1702. The Spanish built a fort there in 1734 and It first appears on a map in 1736 (Holl http://www.davidrumsey.com ). James Oglethorpe invaded Florida in 1739 and overran the fort in 1740. It stopped appearing after 1811 (Carey http://www.davidrumsey.com ). The area is slowly eroding into the St. Johns River. It boasts an historical marker. “Early History of Clay County” includes a detailed treatment of the area.

San Diego de Salamoto (Salamatoto)

Spanish mission. Parade of Memories (pg 4) says it was at West Tocoi; Mark F. Boyd in “Missions Sites in Florida” lists it on the EAST bank of the St. John’s near Picolata (Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol 17, No 4, April 1939). The St. Johns Historical Commission believes it was on the east side and installed a marker there. Blakey’s Parade of Memories references in note 6 need to be explored to see if they are persuasive.

Sand Hill (Sandhill) Lake

First appears on a map in 1864. Very rarely referred to. (33-7-23)

Santa Fe Lake

Lake Sante Fe 1880

Near Melrose, just west of Clay county. The etching shown is from the travelogue “Ekoniah Scrub” by Louise Seymour Townsend.

Scrub

Parade of Memories (pg. 67) deduces Piney Grove was once called Scrub and may then have become the nucleus for Belmore.

Saranac

Sixteenth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1891 and last in 1900.

Self

A railroad stop between Fleming and Magnolia, it appears on maps only in 1929, and is not otherwise referred to.

Seminole Springs

Usually called Wadesboro Springs, on the west side of Doctors Lake.

Seppho

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Shakerag

Apparently in a reference to horse racing, Melrose was apparently called Shakerag early on, including in an 1864 Civil War letter from Brig. Gen Hatch to Col. Noble.

Sharon (sometimes East Sharon and West Sharon)

Fourth and fifth stops of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations. Webb’s directory (1885) indicated that Sharon was settled by its postmaster, J. B. Register and had 250 people. H. E. Bemis established a newspaper in 1884. McGee and Hunt had saw mill(s). Budington, Wilson and Berry had timberland. J. N. Moore ran turpentine still.

Sharon first appears on a map in 1886. East Sharon and Sharon appear in 1888. Sharon and West Sharon in 1891. East Sharon and Sharon are shown on maps until they disappear after 1898. A cemetery (Sharon, or Salem Baptist Church) was consecrated before 1886.

Smaile’s Switch

Fourteenth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1892 where it is called Florence, and finally in 1900.  It boasted a post office from 1891 through 1894. Smaile’s Switch may have originally been called Hunter’s Mill.

Soldiers Pond

After soldiers at Fort No. 11 (19-8-23)

Spring Garden

Spring Garden and Tobacco Bluff were British land grants to John Davis in 1766 along Doctors Lake.

Spring Lake (or Springlake)

Twelfth of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1888 and again in 1891 and finally in 1894. It boasted a post office from 1890 through 1895.

Springfield (Fuente de Laurel)

Kingsley called it Tulula Springs and established a mill there (see photo in Early History, page 85)

Sugarhouse Cove

On Doctors Lake, just north of Doctors Lake Estates.

Sugar works are shown on the Bien 1865 map and the cove north of present day Doctors Lake Estates is still called Sugarhouse Cove.

Sunnyside

Sunnyside boasted a post office from 1908 through 1915, but it doesn’t appear on a map until 1920 and as late as 1929

Swindle Lake

There were several Swindles in the area, about 1880. (11-8-23)

Thomasville (see Wilderness)

Rarely referred to as Thomasville. See a reference in “Florida Place Names” by Morris. Family seat of the Thomas family, Clay County pioneers.

Tiger Head

Site of a Civil War skirmish on a road between Middleburg and Green Cove Springs, October 24, 1864. Described in “Dickinson and His Men” available at the Archives.

Tobacco Bluff

Spring Garden and Tobacco Bluff were British land grants to John Davis in 1766 along Doctors Lake. No map or survey has yet appeared.

Trail Ridge (see Highland, which it was later called)

Turkey Bluff

A 50 acre plantation belonging to the son of Artemis Ferguson. Across Doctors Lake from Harmony Hall.

Tulula Springs

Part of Kingsley’s holdings, usually called Springfield.

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