Towns and Settlements U-Z

Virginia Bluff

Ozias Budington & Henry D. Baldwin bought Jonathan R. Wilson’s store and lot on “Virginia Bluff” [Black Creek] Parade of Memories, pg. 35. Not shown on any map. Middleburg.

Wadesboro Springs

Infrequently called Seminole Springs. On the west side of Doctors Lake. Wade bottled water hear from at least the 1880s through the 1920s.

Walkill (Walkill Farms; previously Bayard Tract)

Shown on plat Book 1, page 33  John G. Borden (of Borden Milk) purchased Clinch’s Bayard Tract and renamed it Walkill. Robert L. Dowling (sometimes incorrectly spelled Dollings), of Ohio, purchased Walkill from Borden’s estate and established the Walkill Stock Farms. Dowling, with his investors bought up nearly one third of the county and established The Florida Farms & Industries Co, hoping to attract farmers. In the end he failed, and eventually J. C. Penney bought his holdings in bankruptcy. First appears on a map in 1886, and again in 1888, and as last as 1932. It boasted a post office from 1886 through 1913.

Waller (sometimes looks like Walter on fuzzy maps)

Waller boasted a post office from 1893 through 1917. Nicholas O. Waller was its postmaster for a time. He made a curious will (it’s a good read) in 1893, and died in 1898. It first appeared on a map in 1892 and finally in 1920. 12,000 acres [Benjamin Talbott  Brooks, The Chemistry of the Non-benzenoid Hydrocarbons and Their Simple Derivatives 1922] were planted in 2,000 camphor trees by the E. I Dupont Power Company, used for making gunpowder. Camp Blanding now encompasses what was Waller.

Wealuste

The Seminoles called Black Creek Wealuste, and Chief Micanopy spent his early days there. (John Lee Williams, The Territory of Florida: Or Sketches of the Topography, Civil and Natural History, of the Country, the Climate, and the Indian Tribes, from the First Discovery to the Present Time 1837)

Wee Louka (or Wee Iouka)

Area along the St. Johns, only referred to once — in an 1846 map.

West Tocoi

A forlorn place in the best of historical times. It boasted a post office from 1885 through 1925, but not much else. It was primarily a stop on the J,T&KW rail line from which passengers could catch a steam launch, the Louise, [The Bulletin, Volume 10, Issue 0 National Railway Historical Society 1945]  from the west side of the river to Tocoi on the other side, and then on to St. Augustine and other places. An 1860 map misspells it Toco and since no “East” Tocoi is shown, the map may have misplaced Tocoi on the wrong side of the river. It first appears correctly in 1885. In 1900 and 1901 its post office was known by the name “Clyde,” and is shown that way on a 1902 map — probably in reference to the Clyde Line steamers. Several references to how poor its depot was have been found dating from 1883 through 1916. A group of block buildings remained until recent years, which had been for the use of black turpentine workers.

Wharf

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

White

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

White House

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

White Springs (or White Sulphur Springs, later called Green Cove Springs)

On the west side of the St. Johns, opposite Picolata, on the Federal Road.

Whitesville (later changed to Webster, and now in Middleburg) (see also, “Old Hut”)

First appeared in 1828 when the County’s first post office was inaugurated there. The post office was in operation until 1843, at which time it was moved to Garey’s Ferry (Middleburg). First written about in the Niles Register 1836. First appeared on the First Territorial Survey in 1833, then again on a map in 1839, then appeared frequently until last in 1883. Its name was changed to Webster in honor of Daniel Webster. Webster first appeared on a map in 1888, and last appeared in 1894. It had assimilated into Middleburg by then. Whitesville/Webster remained a distinct settlement from Garey’s Ferry / Ft. Heileman / Middleburg for most of its existence. (T5-R25-Sec14)

The County Seat from formation of the county in 1859 through 1871 when it was moved to Green Cove Springs.

Whitesville declined in part because they rejected a proposed railroad, which was diverted to Green Cove Springs. It had four streets: Commerce, Pine, Cedar and Mulberry, but Parade of Memories (pg 51) doesn’t give a source or a map.

“Bonnie Melrose,” pg 15, claims that Whitesville was named after Doctor White, who had a partnership with an unsavory Frenchman [perhaps Fourgere, of which nothing else is known.]

Wilby

Shown on only one map in 1888 (source lost) and boasted a post office from 1888 through 1891. No other references.

Wilkerson’s (or Wilkinson’s) (station)

The second of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations(est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appears on a map in 1888, again i 1891 as Wilkerson’s, again in 1897 as Wilkinson’s, last appearing in 1898.

Willford (probably later called Doctors Inlet)

Show on plat book 1, pg 47, Willford was  the precursor to Doctors Inlet. It first appears on a map in 1888 (source lost), again in 1900, and on the O’Hern survey in plat book 1. An 1898 Annual Report of the Railroad Commission of the State of Florida apparently corrupts Willford into Hillsford.

Wilderness (also called Thomasville rarely, then Chesuwiski for a time)

Seventh of the Green Cove Springs & Melrose RR Stations (est. 1882 and closed before 1900). First appearing on a map in 1874, and again 1882, last appearing in 1898. It boasted a post office from 1874 through 1890.

Webb’s directory (1885) indicated that Wilderness had between twenty and thirty families and boasted one church and a common school. Martin Fouts had an orange grove and was postmaster and a mill, Fouts Mill.

Wilkies

One of a series of visual navigation aids on the west side of the St. John’s in Clay County, including: Fire (at Duval County line), Doctor (Orange Park), Lake (where Doctors Lake bridge touches Fleming Island), Ragged (Raggedy Point), False, Middle, Hibernia, Wharf, White House, Fleming, Wilkies (just south of Black Creek), Magnolia (Point), (Magnolia) Hotel, David (Green Cove Springs), Clarendon (Hotel), White, Seppho, Draper, Red (Putnam County line) [FL State Archives: US Coast Survey, Progress Sketch Sec. VI, 1877]

Yellow Water Creek

A tributary of the North Fork of Black Creek flowing from Duval County. In the far northwest part of Clay County.

Scroll Up